Articles | How to stop glasses from slipping down nose?

 

Get a glasses that fits and have it adjusted, then it will not slip. This is the answer that is often given on websites and opticians. Unfortunately, things are seldom so straight forward. Conventional eyewear design are mechanically unstable and will tend to slip down when it is tilted downwards. Choosing the glasses frame that fits your head profile is just a start and this is assuming that the material of the frame offers sufficient grip on your head. Those ultra-flexible frames looks great during demonstration but they may not offer sufficient grip to keep it in place. On the other hand, a very stiff frame is very difficult to adjust such that it fit your head perfectly without hurting your ears.

Watch how a frame with the right stiffness holds on a model


After you have selected the frame that fits your head profile, have the right stiffness and adjusted to your head, does this mean that the glasses will not slip? Most plastic frames are hard and it is very difficult to get the bends right so that it grips well and does not hurt. So for most people, the glasses will still slip after a while. This is where glasses temple covered with soft material will help or if you get a rubbery, soft accessory to slip over the glasses temple. This has the dual function of increasing temple friction and providing a soft cushioning such that the temple will not hurt your ears.

Watch friction sleeve stops glasses slipping


With higher prescription (heavier lens) or if you engage in sports, even a frame temple with added friction may not be sufficient. In this case, a glasses temple earhook will help. The temple earhook provides mechanical anchorage (support) at the back of your ears which will stop glasses from slipping. However, as the back of our ear is soft and is sensitive to excessive pressure, most earhooks may hurt your ears much like cable temple glasses hurts them. In general, the softer the earhook, the lesser possibility that it will hurt your ears. Some earhooks even comes with a flexible design or cushion design such that the pressure on the ear is further reduced to ensure maximum comfort.


Watch FOCUS temple earhook stops glasses slipping even in the most demanding condition.

Cable temple glasses with its curved loop at the end of the temple.

Conventional cable temple glasses with its temple tip curling down to the earlobe offers good mechanical support. However these may squeeze your ears if the fit is not exact. Although the ear is made of soft cartilage, prolong excessive pressure will cause soreness.

Beta-Simplicity Active Eyewear frames come with a anchor tip design which offers excellent support and comfort. Unlike most frames temple tips, the anchor tip is made of ultra-soft elastomer. The engineered anchor tip comes with a cushioning system to reduce the pressure behind the ears while providing much needed mechanical support. The metal core within the soft covering is very responsive to bending for accurate contouring to fit your head profile. This is unlike most other frame temple which are either full plastic or have a hard plastic temple tip which makes it difficult to bend.


Active Eyewear frames from Beta-Simplicity featuring an unique anchor tip design. Visit page .


Jonathan
26 January 2018
Updated: 06 July 2018

 

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